Posts Tagged ‘depression’

Are you an Indigo Child???

June 19, 2019

I am an “Indigo Child”. And I’m a healer. In my practice of energy work and chiropractic, I have encountered a numbebanner2_jpeg (2)r of other indigo children. One is in his late 20’s, one is a young boy living in Shanghai, China, and one is an infant. The others that I have encountered are adults and children of varying ages. What is an indigo child (or adult)? Wikipedia describes them as “children who are believed to possess special, unusual, and sometimes supernatural traits or abilities. The idea is based on concepts developed in the 1970s by Nancy Ann Tappe and further developed by Lee Carroll and Jan Tober.” This is a New Age term used to describe people who have been born within the last several decades who have a stronger, somewhat different brain energy.

From my own observations and descriptions from others, the following is a summary of traits that are common among indigo people:

  • Naturally intuitive, maybe even a little psychic – able to sense and feel things that many people are unaware of.
  • Non-conformist – resists rigid authority, does not like to follow well-worn paths, prefers to choose their own way (not even conforming to non-mainstream groups).
  • Often feels out of place – doesn’t “belong” – since their energy is different, they often feel like they don’t fit in, especially in school and many other social situations. They’re often a loner, except with people who have similar energy.
  • May be prone to depression, ADD/ADHD, and other social/emotional difficulties.
  • Generally higher IQ – may be very analytical and have a desire to understand how things work (including life).
  • Creative and inventive – music and/or art is important. When combined with non-conformity, they often prefer to come up with new ideas than to use established tools and techniques.
  • Though feelings of inferiority are common, they generally feel that they’re better at seeing the big picture and understanding what’s happening in the world. People say that indigos are very self-assured. They generally know that they’re special, but since they don’t feel like they belong, they often struggle with their feelings of self-worth. Since they often are more assured of their viewpoint, they can be seen as arrogant or cocky. They have high expectations of themselves and others.
  • Are empathetic, curious, and strong-willed.
  • Possess a clear sense of self-definition and purpose – they’re often a leader, have a strong sense of integrity, and have a passion to find and fulfill their purpose in life.
  • Strong tendency toward spirituality, often exhibited early in life. May not be religious unless they find a religion that addresses their drive for purpose and meaning in life. May also feel drawn to the paranormal.
  • They often have a strong feeling of entitlement – feeling like they deserve to be here.
  • Tend to be more emotional – feel more deeply than most people. They don’t want to hurt or disappoint anyone. Money often takes a back seat to fulfillment.

Can you relate to some or all of these traits? If so, you may be an indigo. Do these describe your child, a friend, or someone else? They could be indigo. But how can you really know? No two people are alike. Remarkably, I have two indigo staff members. Their personalities are very different, although they share some of these same characteristics. Someone could have practically every one of these traits but not be indigo. Someone else could only relate to a few of these traits, but definitely be indigo. So how would you know?

Having worked with several indigo children over the last couple of years, and using muscle testing and brain balancing techniques that I use (part of the Vital Balance technique), I’ve noticed certain patterns. Recently I’ve been using some of this testing on almost all of my patients. While it still appears that indigo children are a small part of the overall population, there are many more than I had originally thought! You’re seldom going to find something you’re not looking for. Now that I’m looking for them, they’re not quite as rare as I thought.

Is being indigo a good thing or a bad thing? The answer is a definite yes. In other words, it can be both a blessing and a curse. Indigos can be great healers, but they tend to be far more vulnerable to picking up other people’s negative energy. They may be very spiritual, but are more likely to have attachments from dark forces that they don’t want. They may be more inventive, able to see the bigger picture, be smarter, but feel like an outsider, not a part of the group, which can lead to depression and lack of self-worth, and so on. So there’s plenty of good and bad.

Indigos need special consideration when I do my energy and emotion work. I’ve been able to help them lead more stable and enjoyable lives. I’ve been able to help some of them develop their special talents more so they can help others.

Would you like to know if you or a member of your family is indigo? As I said, I’ve developed a short test of the brain energy to determine if someone is indigo. For a limited time, I’m offering this test for free! You can be in the office, on the phone, or just email. (I do a lot of this work remotely by proxy.) To arrange for this free, no obligation test, go to http://www.goodhealthchiro.com/indigo.html.

 

The Trap of Self-pity

November 27, 2018

I recently had a breakthrough in my life. Through muscle testing and inspiration, it was pointed out to me that I have an issue with self-pity. As I worked on it, I could remember so many times in my life that I’ve felt sorry for myself. I could see how this self-pity was interfering with my life and holding me back. I have partially conquered this issue in my life and am now beginning to see the fruits of it. I don’t believe I’m the only one that has this problem. Self-pity, I believe, is a huge problem for a lot of people in their lives, even though it may not be obvious. The main fruits of self-pity are bitterness, discouragement and depression.Sad pity

Why do we tend to feel sorry for ourselves so much? For some, it could be that they were raised to look at life that way. Perhaps your parents always dwelt on their own problems, or they kept reminding you of your problems. They may have been lovingly expressing sympathy, but inadvertently teaching you to focus on your problems and feel sorrow about them. For others, it could have been the opposite situation. Perhaps no one seemed to care about your problems. You may have felt that the only person you were going to get any sympathy was from yourself. So you learned to feel sorry for yourself. After a while, it was such a normal way of thinking that you became totally unaware of it.

How do we know if we’re feeling sorry for ourselves? Self-pity is an inward-facing emotion. Possible signs include:

  • Moping about or spending a lot of time thinking about your problems and difficult circumstances
  • Repeated or sustained feelings of anger, frustration, depression, resentment or worry about the situation that you’re in
  • Feeling like you’re never good enough or worthy to receive the good things in life that you desire
  • Feelings of inferiority based on your current circumstances
  • Feeling like you just want to give up
  • Dwelling excessively on your own shortcomings and perceived failures

“But Dr. Don,” you say, “my problems are very real! I’ve had terrible things happen to me, many of which were not even my fault! I think I’m entitled to feel sorry for myself. My issues are not self-pity but the horrible crap that I have to put up with!”

You might even say, “I’ve been through a lot. I’ve EARNED the right to be this miserable!”

Perhaps you have. It is certainly not my intention to minimize your problems. We all have issues, from minor annoyances to horrible, gut-wrenching trauma. The question is, do you want to continue to be a victim of the things that have happened to you (or perhaps even the mistakes you’ve made), or do you want to take back control of your life? I’ve known many people who seem to glory in their misery. They want the world to see what a terrible hand they’ve been dealt in life. They want to invite everyone around them to their “pity party”. And again, I’m not making light of their problems. However, wallowing in their misery has become a part of their life.

Keller selfpityIt takes courage to break free of the pattern of self-pity. It takes an open mind and humility to even see the problem. It means taking responsibility for your life and happiness. It can be much easier to blame your circumstances on everything and everyone around you. If you really need to continue wallowing in your misery a while longer, or if you’re not ready to take charge of your situation in life, then stop reading this. Come back when you’re ready. I won’t judge you.

Still with me? Okay. Let’s charge ahead. And that’s much of the solution – KEEP MOVING FORWARD. Half of the solution you may have already accomplished at this point. If a light has just turned on in your head, if you’re starting to realize that you’ve been indulging in self-pity and can see how it’s been holding you back in your life, you’re already halfway there!

I will say this here and now – discouragement is of the devil (the adversary). God will Carnegie selfpityNEVER tell you to give up, stop trying, and just pack it in. Discouragement is one of the first fruits of self-pity. Discouragement makes you just want to give up, to sit down in the middle of the proverbial road and mope in your misery. Once you recognize the patterns of feeling sorry for yourself, then whenever such thoughts come into your mind, you can toss them aside and replace them with “keep moving forward”.

Remember that you can’t steer a parked car.

Does this mean that you stop taking care of your own needs and desires? Definitely not. What do you do when you’re hungry? Do you just plop down in your easy chair and whine about how hungry you are? I hope not! You go get something to eat. If you have nothing to eat, you work on getting some money, or going to the store, or whatever you need to do to get some food. It won’t fill your belly to just sit down and moan about it.

That same principle applies to every other problem in your life. You must focus on the solution, not the problem. Once you acknowledge and understand what the problem is, there’s no need to dwell any further on the problem or how miserable and complicated it’s making your life. Instead, toss aside your negative thoughts and start working on how to solve the problem. If you cannot see any reasonable solution that you can carry out anytime soon, then resolve to have patience. Remember the Prayer of Serenity, which I’ve referenced before –

“God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change,
Courage to change the things I can,
And wisdom to know the difference.”

This also reminds me of another saying – “Work will win when wishy-washy wishing won’t”. Keep moving forward!

I must also mention here that true clinical depression is often not the result of self-pity. There can be an imbalance or deficiency of certain chemicals in your brain that cause feelings of depression, even when life is going along okay. You can’t just “cheer up”. If this is the case for you, be sure to see your doctor. (I also help some people with this condition using drugless approaches.) In this case, what I’m saying in this post mostly does not apply to you. However, many people with minor clinical depression can needlessly wind up in a downward spiral. In that case, instead of being initially depressed about your situation, you get physically/chemically depressed and then look for reasons to justify your depression. That makes sense. However, as you find the reasons, the depression gets worse because now you have more motivation to be depressed! So in this situation, the above principles DO apply. Maybe you can’t completely shake the depression, but you may be able to control it better so that it doesn’t become disabling.

Share this blog post. I’ve never asked for this before, but I feel the need to get this message out to as many people as possible. Self-pity manifests itself as other emotions. It’s also not something we like to admit to. Therefore, it’s generally overlooked. Since it is the foundation of some of these other emotional issues, it could be why it’s so hard sometimes to correct ongoing feelings of depression, lack of self-worth, discouragement, etc. I may yet write a whole book about this, but for now, I’ll have to settle for this short blog post. My business has picked up so much, I don’t have much time for writing. In the meantime…

LOOK UP! KEEP MOVING FORWARD!

Tribute to Robin Williams

August 12, 2014

Robin WilliamsIt was announced yesterday that the great comedian and actor, Robin Williams, was found dead of an apparent suicide. His wife issued a statement saying that he was suffering from severe depression. I understand that he had a history of depression, alcoholism and drug abuse.

I have been very sad since hearing about Mr. Williams’ death. I’ve loved his movies and shows. I’ve always been very impressed with his creativity and humor. He was bursting with talent. I don’t know about any of his religious or political views. At the moment, I don’t even care. All I know is that I loved him and am mourning his passing. As I look back on the years at all the things he’s done, starting with Mork & Mindy, I realize what a part he has played in my life and in the lives of my children. A talent such as his is very rare. He will definitely be missed.

Because I work with depression and other physical and emotional issues using the Emotion Code and Body Code, I’ve been thinking a lot about the depression that Robin Williams was dealing with. I don’t generally work with people who are on the verge of suicide or have significant mental illness, but I do work with people who are struggling with various issues in their life. As I’ve thought about Robin Williams, I’ve wondered what part did his depression, the issues he was struggling with, play in his genius. Was he so talented in spite of his emotional struggles or because of them? I’ve heard it said that you have to have suffered to become a truly great artist. Was his humor his coping mechanism? If he didn’t have the horrible emotional issues to deal with, would he have been so talented? Would he even have been so funny? Why was he able to bring so much joy to others when he found it so elusive for himself?

Our pain, our joy, our trials, our experiences – all these combine to make us who we are. What if Robin Williams didn’t have the pain and consequently didn’t have the degree of talent to be so hilariously funny and popular? The world would have lost out for sure. On the other hand, we wouldn’t have another victim of suicide. It’s impossible to know what would have happened, how Mr. Williams’ talent would have developed without the inner turmoil.

This all begs the question – what is going on inside of our minds that is shaping who we are? Would we have the skills, the talent, the compassion, and the understanding that we have now if it weren’t for our pain and trials? It’s hard to say. It’s just as easy to think about the wonderful things we could achieve if we weren’t held back by the baggage of our past traumas. I personally believe that it’s truly worth it to do all we can to overcome and release the negative effects of our past difficulties. That way we can maximize the joy in our life. We can still draw from the experiences of the past without continuing to feel their pain. After all, joy is the reason we exist.

Writing this blog entry is my way of dealing with the pain of losing this wonderful beacon of talent. I will remember the wonderful contributions that he’s made over the years. Thank you, Robin Williams!