Posts Tagged ‘healthcare’

Don’t Sneeze on Me!

February 28, 2018
220px-Rotavirus_Reconstruction

Rotavirus

Are you a germaphobe? Or in other words, do you suffer from mysophobia? Do you freak out or are tempted to spray a can of Lysol in your face if someone sneezes within 40 feet of your personal space? Clinically, you probably don’t have this phobia. However, I see a lot of people that seem to come close to it. Do you subscribe to germ theory – the idea that many diseases are caused by microorganisms (or pathogens) such as bacteria and viruses? If you do, you’re not alone. Most people see it that way. And I’m not here to disprove it or say that germ theory is all wrong. However, I believe we need a more balanced view.

Blaming illness on infection by common germs is like a drunk driver who hit a telephone pole blaming his injuries on the telephone pole. Was the telephone pole directly responsible for the damage to his car and his body? Yes, of course. Was the telephone pole the cause of his accident? Of course not! He was driving drunk! That’s why he hit the pole.

I don’t dispute the existence of bacteria, viruses, and other pathogens or their role in illness and infection. Even I have taken antibiotics when I had infections that could not be controlled by more natural means. And yes, there are some pathogens for which our immune systems cannot mount an adequate defense (such as Ebola). However, in most instances, our immune systems are capable of fighting off illness or infection due to reasonable exposure to common germs.

Pathogens, or the illnesses they are related to, are rated on two scales – morbidity and mortality. Basically, morbidity means what percentage of people who are exposed to a pathogen actually get sick from it. Mortality is the percentage of people who die from it. There are many factors that affect morbidity and mortality, outside of how mean the germ is. These include your basic level of health, stress levels, nutrition, age, etc. Often times, the very young (whose immune system hasn’t matured yet) and the very old (whose immune system is worn down) are the most susceptible.

Our susceptibility to illness varies from day to day, sometimes from moment to moment. For instance, strong negative emotions such as fear and anger seem to put our immune system on hold temporarily, leaving us vulnerable. Excessive sugar intake (as with most Americans) can cause our immune system to be depressed. Lack of sleep, too much stress, vertebral subluxations, poor eating habits (i.e. junk food – high in toxins and chemicals, low in nutrition), and other factors also reduce our immunity.

Some of these things are hard to avoid. Lifestyle changes are generally difficult to make overnight. So it is wise to reduce the exposure. That doesn’t mean to be a germaphobe, but just exercise a little caution. It’s important to note that many viruses (such as those that cause cold and flu) thrive in a warm, moist environment, such as your sinuses. You should wash your hands with soap and water a few times a day. Why? It’s not that your hands are susceptible to these viruses. It’s because we can’t seem to keep our hands away from our nose and eyes! Those are the pathways to our sinuses. What goes in the mouth (except for poisons and serious toxins) is usually not as much of an issue.

So, yes, be on your guard in a reasonable fashion. However, if you do get ill, the most effective way to figure out what happened is not to look around and see where you got the germs. You need to look in the mirror and try to figure out why your immune system failed you. It probably won’t be too hard to figure out. Most illness happens when you’re not taking very good care of yourself or you’re under a lot of stress. Take responsibility for your health and your emotions. Take care of yourself, and get natural, effective healthcare as needed.

P.S.- After I published this, I thought of some personal insights I’d like to add. What prompted this particular blog post is that I was recently sick (first time in 2-3 years). My wife is prone to bronchitis due to her asthma, which is related to a weakness left behind from having pneumonia as an infant. In spite of this, she did very well this winter until a few weeks ago. She came down with bronchitis. Then a week later, I got it. Many people would say this is typical, but in our house, it’s not the norm. While I was caring for her, I had a particularly stressful night where I slept very little. The stress plus the lack of sleep weakened my immune system. Low immunity plus high exposure equals a strong chance of getting sick.

My children are all adopted. They come from very different gene pools. But one thing they all had in common is that they rarely got sick as they were growing up. I’ve heard of families where illness goes around from child to child and often starts up again at the first child, continuing the cycle. Our family was not like that at all. My kids didn’t eat great, but their diet was above average. I taught them to enjoy fruits and vegetables and limited their consumption of junk food. But most importantly, I kept them in proper alignment with chiropractic. Whenever they would start to not feel well, I would give them an adjustment. Then they would either not get sick or it would be very mild. By working to keep their immune systems strong, there was very little illness in my home.

For more information on caring for your health and well-being, go to www.GoodHealthChiro.com or www.ohanachiropractor.com.

Advertisements

The Gray Side of Health

June 20, 2014

stethoscope2When you’re young and idealistic, many things in life can seem pretty black and white. But as one gets older, you learn that there are so many nuances and variations that in some cases, issues become muddled gray. After being in practice for 30 years, you would think I would be very good at predicting outcomes and telling people how much treatment they will need and so forth. However, just the opposite has happened. I can tell people what is somewhat typical, but every person, every case is so unique that it’s impossible to predict much of anything accurately. One thing I love about doing energy work is that we’re able to do muscle testing on people to find out more specifically what they need.

Health itself is not black and white. I think it’s strange that many people think of themselves as either healthy or sick. If you’re not sick, you must be healthy, and vice versa. To me, health is a continuum. No one is 100% sick (we call that dead). No one is 100% healthy without a single flaw. So we’re always somewhere in between. There’s a balance between our tolerance level and the level of our health. Any time that the level of any health problem exceeds the level of our tolerance for it, we experience symptoms. If the health problem gets worse, or if the tolerance level drops (which can be due to fatigue, stress, etc.), we become more aware of the health problem. While it is true that there are some rare deadly diseases for which our immune systems are not prepared, for the most part, illness doesn’t just suddenly occur because of exposure to bacteria or viruses. A truly healthy person won’t suddenly become ill because someone sneezed in their vicinity or they touched some horribly infected doorknob. I always say that when you get sick, you shouldn’t look around to see who shared their germs with you. You look in the mirror and ask yourself why your immune system was weakened. Generally you don’t have to strain your brain coming up with an answer for that one.

Allergies are another area where we see a lot of gray. Many people, if they don’t have an allergy that makes them break out in hives or have their throat close up, think they don’t have allergies. I see an allergy as an incompatibility between the energy of the body and the energy of a substance. That incompatibility may be extreme or it may be minor or anything in between. For some people, it may be a food that they eat every day, which is weakening them, making them tired and more prone to illness, aches and pains. NAET (Nambudripad Allergy Elimination Technique) is a tool we use to help find and treat hidden allergies.

When we’re doing energy work with people and using muscle testing, we can’t really ask about named diseases. The body (or subconscious mind) doesn’t think that way. It’s all about imbalances and interferences. Lab values and other types of measurements that are commonly used in healthcare can be very useful, but we have to remember that the numbers are simply values that we’ve agreed upon – a way for us to draw the line between needing medical treatment for a problem and not needing medical treatment. What’s just right for one person may not be the perfect value for another person. Besides, we need to remember that it’s a continuum. If a value is not where it should be, it doesn’t matter whether it’s crossed an imaginary line or not. It should be addressed (naturally if possible).

Some people, when they get what they feel is a definitive diagnosis, are very relieved. They feel that it’s not so much of a mystery now, which gives them more of a feeling of control. I don’t want to rob anyone of the peace that they get from that, but often it’s just an illusion. The word diagnosis means to know what’s going on inside the body (dia=through, gnosis= to know). In many cases, it’s just a best guess. Even with lab tests, positive exam findings and classic symptomatology, how can we truly KNOW for certain what’s happening in the body? Muscle testing, done properly, can also be effective at getting to the root of the problem.

Then there are those for whom a diagnosis is their downfall, especially when it comes out of the blue or destroys what little hope they were clinging to. I heard of a lady who got her test results back, and based on those results, the doctor gave her six months to live. Sure enough, six months later, she died. Later, they found out that the test results had gotten mixed up with someone else’s. She was fine. She simply died because she believed she would. I can’t say for sure if that’s an urban myth or a real event, but I’ve seen the principle in action many times. Some people get a diagnosis and they fully accept it as part of who they are. They play the part to the max and become far more of a victim of the disease (whether they actually have it or not) than they need to be. My father died of cancer. He was given the diagnosis of malignant brain cancer and was told that he would die in less than a year, which he did. I’ve often wondered if there was a little bit of a self-fulfilling prophecy there. Would he have lived longer if the doctors would have told him that there was a strong chance of pulling through and beating the cancer? I guess we’ll never know in this case.

As much as we’d always like definite, well-understood answers to our health issues, there aren’t many cases when we have such absolute information. I’ve written previously about how complex our bodies are. It’s this complexity that makes it difficult to pin down exact answers. There is always hope however. We do have a lot of good information and we can use muscle testing to find out what imbalances people have to help them overcome health problems. I think the important thing to remember is that the body knows what it’s doing most of the time. It’s smarter than any doctor. Generally the best thing we can do is to remove interferences, give it the nutrients, exercise and so forth that it needs, then get out of the way and let it express good health and happiness.

The Complexity of Healthcare

June 14, 2013

Internal organs

The human body is extremely complex. I believe that any comment or approach that implies otherwise is naïve and an insult to the Creator. I have been treating people for over 30 years and I think I’m less confident now in giving patients a prognosis than I was in the beginning. That’s because I’ve found that people are very unpredictable. We’re not machines produced on an assembly line. Each of us is a unique individual. What’s normal for one person may not be for another. There is a saying that goes something like this: if all you have is a hammer, then you see every issue as a nail. It’s that way in healthcare. If you’re a surgeon, you’re far more likely to recommend surgery. That can be motivated somewhat by greed, but in all fairness, it’s natural to look first for a solution that you typically work with. Someone who isn’t involved with surgery is more likely to consider it a last resort. As a chiropractor, I see many health problems as being related to nerve interference secondary to vertebral subluxations (spine out of alignment). Most of the time, I’m proven right, but I realize that’s usually not the complete picture. Health problems generally have many facets to them.

There is frequently a temptation to oversimplify. We get one or two clues about a possible condition and suddenly we think we know all about it. Non-professional friends and relatives are quick to give you a diagnosis and give you a suggestion for how to manage it. Even professionals may do the same thing. Have you ever gone to the doctor with four different problems and walked out with four different prescriptions? That happened to me a few years ago. I was taught to look at the whole picture before offering a diagnosis, which is the basis of the prescribed treatment. So I wanted to see what my medical doctor would say about some issues that I was having at the time. So I gave him a list of my symptoms. Instead of looking at the bigger picture to see how the symptoms fit together so he could have a good understanding of what was going with me, he looked at each symptom separately and prescribed treatment for each one.

When I was in chiropractic college, which is similar to medical school in many ways, I was always amazed at the number of physiological principles that were not totally understood. It’s important to understand that, in spite of all the fancy instruments, scientific studies and research, healthcare is more art than science. There’s a helpful article about the problems with research entitled “That Study Is Wrong: The Truth About Research”. In actual practice, there is not a great deal of precision. We should certainly strive for greater precision and the ability to duplicate positive results. However, it’s important to understand that it’s not an exact science. That’s why a little inspiration and intuition can be so helpful.

I am constantly amazed at the functioning of the human body. (I realize this all applies to animals also, but the human body is what I work with.) It’s not only a highly coordinated system of many thousands of intricate chemical and electrical processes, but when you add in the mind, the spirit, the electromagnetic fields and so forth, it’s totally astounding! (And to think that all of that came about by accidents of nature! [yeah, right]) I’ve seen lots of people who talk about their body as if it were some old piece of machinery held together by bubble gum and baling wire and that anything they can do to it would be an improvement. That simply is not true. I have great respect for the body. I rely on treatment methods that work in conjunction with the wisdom of the body, rather than fighting against it. There are many drugs (pharmaceuticals) out there that are necessary. However, many drugs are designed to “trick” the body, to make it think that internal conditions are different than what they really are so that we can get it to provide a desired physiological response. The problem is that the body is far smarter than the doctor, not the other way around. So you need to be very careful taking that kind of control into your own hands!

I firmly believe that our bodies were designed by an all-knowing, loving Creator. Our bodies have great wisdom. For the most part, if we remove interference and give them what they need (physically, chemically, emotionally, etc.), then all we need to do is get out of the way and let them function as they were created to do.